Famous open-source software Retroarch will be making its way to Steam for the first time later this month. Retroarch is a freely available piece of software that can emulate a great number of different retro gaming consoles, as well as playing numerous game engines and media applications. The software has been ported to everything from smartphones, to home game consoles and even handhelds such as the PSvita, but until now was only available on PC from the software’s official website. The software is coming to Valve’s storefront at a time when Retroarch is trying to broaden its user base and will be contacting developers in hopes that some may want to use the software to bring their original IPs to Steam.

While Retroarch is a software designed to allow the use of multiple types of applications, it is primarily used to emulate video games and is the core that lies at the heart of many modern arcade builds and retro gaming boxes. The integration with Steam will make it much easier for people to access their retro video games via Steam streaming, as well as making the use of retro games on a PC much more convenient.

While the release will not use the Steam SDK or have any Steam-specific features at launch, in a news post the software developers said they would ” begin exploring options on how we can start leveraging Steam’s functionality as a platform.” Retroarch will be available on Steam around July 30th, and you can add the software to your wishlist via its store page. It will be free like all versions, and will first be available for Windows via Steam with Mac and Linux support to follow.

What do you think of Retroarch making its way to Steam? Will you be installing Retroarch when it comes out at the end of July? Let us know what you think in the comment section down below. 



William Worrall


Staff Writer

I’m Will and I’m a UK-based writer who went to film school before realizing writing was more fun than film-making. I’ve written for a number of gaming sites over the past few years of my writing career, including Cliqist, Gaming Respawn, and TechRaptor. I also produce videos for my own channel (Mupple) as well as Cliqists popular YouTube channel. I’ve covered industry events such as EGX and am hoping to break into narrative game writing in the future.




Source link